Police: USF biologist dies in an apparent suicide by cyanide

A while back I posted a story on Frank Olsen, a former scientist for the military working in biology, creating bioweapons.  He “committed suicide” by jumping from a window in a New York mental hospital after, according to an admission from the CIA, being slipped LSD by The Agency.  Of course, they would never admit to this, unless it was to cover something far worse, like the obvious murder that occured in lieu of the “suicide”.

Since then, there have been dozens of “suicides” by  biologists.  It appears to be one of the most stressful and depressing jobs to have ever existed, as it is indeed a short lived career choice.  Normally, a suicide would not raise too eye brows.  But when it is suicide by cyanide, that is interesting.  When that suicide was a molecular biologist, you have a full blown conspiracy.

TEMPLE TERRACE — A University of South Florida molecular biologist died Monday night in an apparent suicide by cyanide at a Temple Terrace hotel, police said.

Chitra Chauhan, 33, of Tampa was pronounced dead at University Community Hospital about 10:30 p.m., Temple Terrace police reported.

The discovery of the toxic substance also prompted evacuation of 75 to 100 guests at the Extended Stay America hotel on Morris Bridge Road, where Chauhan had taken a room.

Chauhan was a post-doctoral researcher in the Global Health department in the College of Public Health.

She has a 3-year-old child with her husband, Bharath Balu, who is also a researcher in the department.

A note was found at the scene. Police did not disclose the contents. According to a medical examiner’s report, Chauhan had made prior attempts.

Police got two 911 calls Monday night. One came from Chauhan’s husband, who said she called home to tell him she had taken cyanide, the report stated. Another call came after Chauhan stumbled out of her hotel room and told a couple in the hall.

Paramedics rushed her to a hospital, but it was too late.

When ingested or inhaled, cyanide quickly deprives cells of oxygen, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“It’s not a safe substance, so it’s not an easy thing to come by,” said Cynthia Lewis-Younger, director of the Florida Poison Information Center in Tampa.

Chauhan’s husband told police that his wife would have access to cyanide at work, according to the medical examiner’s report.

No one else was harmed by the cyanide, police said. On Tuesday, a biotech company did an environmental cleanup at the hotel, and it reopened.

USF officials released a statement saying they were saddened to learn of Chauhan’s death. The university plans to notify the community of public memorial services.

She earned her doctorate from the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology in New Delhi, India, in 2005, then studied mosquitoes and disease transmission at the University of Notre Dame.

“Chitra was just a wonderful person,” said David W. Severson, her former lab leader at Notre Dame. “She was very bright. She was very enthusiastic. Everyone liked her very much.”

Source

 

The US did recently release genetically modified mosquitos.  There are elements of things like that which must be covered up.  Apparently, at all costs.   Mosquitos were something of a specialty for this lady.

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